New mother's milk bank opened at Freiburg University Hospital

A new mother's milk bank has been launched at Freiburg University Hospital
In recent years, the advantages of mother's milk have been scientifically proven for the health of newcomers."Especially premature babies benefit from the unique components of mother's milk, which, among other things, provide them with a natural protection against infections and severe dyspnea problems," according to the report of the Freiburg University Clinic. In order to ensure the availability of breastmilk even in women who do not produce enough milk or not enough milk, the first women's milk bank was now launched in Freiburg, Germany.

Mothers of preterm infants are often "little or even no milk," according to the Freiburg University Hospital. "Up to now, in such cases a premature pre-nourishment on the basis of artificial infant nutrition had been necessary. A better alternative is, however, the use of donated mother's milk, reports the Freiburg University Hospital, citing the recommendation of the World Health Organization( WHO).Here the new Muttermilchbank is to offer help in the future.

First mother milk bank opened in Baden-Württemberg.(Image: cicisbeo / fotolia.com

Optimal care for the premature and newborn
The first women's milk bank of Baden-Württemberg was opened at the Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine of the Freiburg University Hospital under the guidance of the neonatologist and pediatric intensive care physician Dr. Daniel KlotzMothers of premature infants or neonates who, in addition to the need of their own child, form an excess of mother 's milk, donate their milk to the optimal diet of other premature infants in the clinic. "

Mother' s milk is prepared for storage
Forthe storage in the women's milk bank, the donated mother's milk is first microbiologically examined and if necessary pasteurized, then the storage takes place at minus 20 degrees Celsius. "The milk stands after the preparation for the consumption of premature babies and sick newborns who do not milk their own Mu"said the Uni-Mothers of other newborns and premature babies, who are treated at the neonatal intensive care unit of the Freiburg University Hospital, are provided as donors. The women are specially selected and tested for diseases, the medical experts explain.

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    "The goal of our dairy milk bank is to provide all very small premature babies of our own department with mother's milkso that they can benefit from the valuable components of mother's milk, "emphasizes Dr. Klotz. Thus, premature infants fed with donated mother's milk instead of artificial infant feed are, among other things, significantly less affected by serious intestinal complications and they show a better nutritional tolerance. In addition, a better neurological development in premature babies is assumed by the mother's milk, the uniclinic continues. According to Dr. Klotz provides "the women's milk bank an important building block in the optimal care of our smallest premature babies."( Fp)

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